Summer Book List

by gimmegoodstyle

2013-06-23 15:32:16 +00001

Summer holiday is like a giant empty void of boredom that sucks us and leaves us alone with nothing but misery. Sorry, I am just having the infamous ‘tired of holiday’ mood. I have nothing to do this summer and I feel really sick! Ugh! I know, I have to find something to cheer me up and avoid being exposed to cabin fever thing (think The Shining), I don’t want to kill anyone and have to freeze outside during snowstorm (yeah, I am watching The Shining right now).

Anyway, one thing that saves my boring holiday is my enormous book collections that I have read again and again. In fact, books also help me avoid awkward situation (yeah, I am reading a book right now, so I can’t talk to you and your friends-whose-name-I-don’t-remember) and hard situation (yeah, I am reading a book right now, so I can’t answer the phone for you). But honestly they’re getting boring, I need to buy new books ASAP and while writing down my books-shopping-list, I suddenly have an idea to share it with you guys (because we’re such great internet friends with great attitudes!). Isn’t it exciting to read my shopping-list? But then I realize everyone is doing the same thing during summer from Summer Music List to Summer Food List…

Okay, maybe I am a bit too late, but better late than never, right?

(Am I quoting the right phrase?)

1. Inferno by Dan Brown

In the heart of Italy, Harvard professor of symbology Robert Langdon is drawn into a harrowing world centered on one of history’s most enduring and mysterious literary masterpieces . . . Dante’s Inferno.

Against this backdrop, Langdon battles a chilling adversary and grapples with an ingenious riddle that pulls him into a landscape of classic art, secret passageways, and futuristic science. Drawing from Dante’s dark epic poem, Langdon races to find answers and decide whom to trust . . . before the world is irrevocably altered.

I am such a sucker to Dan Brown’s book. I love the controversial theories, the facts, the histories, the religions, the characters. Even though sometimes I feel like an idiot trying to understand what the hell he is writing about. I can’t wait to lay my hands on Inferno and I wish it is as good as his other books.

2. Revenge Wears Prada by Lauren Weisberger

Almost a decade has passed since Andy Sachs quit the job “a million girls would die for” working for Miranda Priestly at Runway magazine—a dream that turned out to be a nightmare. Andy and Emily, her former nemesis and co-assistant, have since joined forces to start a highend bridal magazine. The Plunge has quickly become required reading for the young and stylish. Now they get to call all the shots: Andy writes and travels to her heart’s content; Emily plans parties and secures advertising like a seasoned pro. Even better, Andy has met the love of her life. Max Harrison, scion of a storied media family, is confident, successful, and drop-dead gorgeous. Their wedding will be splashed across all the society pages as their friends and family gather to toast the glowing couple. Andy Sachs is on top of the world.

But karma’s a bitch. The morning of her wedding, Andy can’t shake the past. And when she discovers a secret letter with crushing implications, her wedding-day jitters turn to cold dread. Andy realizes that nothing—not her husband, nor her beloved career—is as it seems. She never suspected that her efforts to build a bright new life would lead her back to the darkness she barely escaped ten years ago—and directly into the path of the devil herself…

Drama with fashion? I am in. The Devil Wears Prada is the only reason why I want to be an assistant (note: fashion magazine’s assistant). Although most people say that Lauren’s second book is a mess, I still want to read it and maybe it can be the second reason why I want to be a slave..eh, assistant.

3. The Perks of Being A Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky 

Charlie is a freshman.

And while he’s not the biggest geek in the school, he is by no means popular. Shy, introspective, intelligent beyond his years yet socially awkward, he is a wallflower, caught between trying to live his life and trying to run from it.

Charlie is attempting to navigate his way through uncharted territory: the world of first dates and mix tapes, family dramas and new friends; the world of sex, drugs, and The Rocky Horror Picture Show, when all one requires is that perfect song on that perfect drive to feel infinite. But he can’t stay on the sideline forever. Standing on the fringes of life offers a unique perspective. But there comes a time to see what it looks like from the dance floor.

I watched the movie and it was an amazing experience. I am touched, people! I, one of the most annoying bloggers on the internet with subjective review and old-gossips, is touched by drama movie with not-really-big budget! I almost cry and feel sorry for Charlie. And Emma Watson because she has to speak with American accent. Eh, anyway I can’t wait to read the book’s version of Charlie.

4. The Fault in Our Stars by John Green 

Despite the tumor-shrinking medical miracle that has bought her a few years, Hazel has never been anything but terminal, her final chapter inscribed upon diagnosis. But when a gorgeous plot twist named Augustus Waters suddenly appears at Cancer Kid Support Group, Hazel’s story is about to be completely rewritten.

Same case with numer 3, I am hoping that this book can touch me the way Stephen Chbosky did. The plot seems to be promising enough….

5. To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee

The unforgettable novel of a childhood in a sleepy Southern town and the crisis of conscience that rocked it. To Kill A Mockingbird became both an instant bestseller and a critical success when it was first published in 1960. It went on to win the Pulitzer Prize in 1961 and was later made into an Academy Award-winning film, also a classic.

You don’t need further introduction because this book is classic and sick at the same time! I simply love the background of the story, the sleepy Southern town, the characters, the problems, and even the weathers! Harper is truly a genius author who knows how to create a complex yet still easy to read story.

6. The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstren

The circus arrives without warning. No announcements precede it. It is simply there, when yesterday it was not. Within the black-and-white striped canvas tents is an utterly unique experience full of breathtaking amazements. It is called Le Cirque des Rêves, and it is only open at night. 

But behind the scenes, a fierce competition is underway—a duel between two young magicians, Celia and Marco, who have been trained since childhood expressly for this purpose by their mercurial instructors. Unbeknownst to them, this is a game in which only one can be left standing, and the circus is but the stage for a remarkable battle of imagination and will. Despite themselves, however, Celia and Marco tumble headfirst into love—a deep, magical love that makes the lights flicker and the room grow warm whenever they so much as brush hands. 

True love or not, the game must play out, and the fates of everyone involved, from the cast of extraordinary circus per­formers to the patrons, hang in the balance, suspended as precariously as the daring acrobats overhead.

Ah…love, magic, and faith-is-a-bitch in one book? It sounds like Twilight Saga with no Bella or, at least, stronger Bella. Honestly, one thing that makes me see the book is the illustration. Let’s hope the story is as good as the cover. Okay, and it’s pretty much cheaper than the rest.

Plot taken from Good Reads

Advertisements